Cameroonian researcher invents malaria larvicide

Agnes Antoinette, a researcher from Cameroon has invented an atypical larvicide developed from plants to fight malaria.

Surrounding plants and leaves from trees, which she keeps secret, are the ingredients she uses to make her mosquito larvae killer. But what makes this project special is the nanotechnology.

This is “an asset” because nanoparticles are currently involved in all areas of science but have not always been associated with plants, the Cameroonian researcher told Anadolu Agency in confiding the features of her solution.

Used differently from insecticides, which the researcher finds infective and harmful to the environment and human health, this larvicide is made to destroy the larvae of mosquitoes that cause malaria.

Surrounding plants and leaves from trees, which she keeps secret, are the ingredients she uses to make her mosquito larvae killer. But what makes this project special is the nanotechnology.

This is “an asset” because nanoparticles are currently involved in all areas of science but have not always been associated with plants, the Cameroonian researcher told Anadolu Agency in confiding the features of her solution.

Used differently from insecticides, which the researcher finds infective and harmful to the environment and human health, this larvicide is made to destroy the larvae of mosquitoes that cause malaria.

As a doctoral student in science, Ntoumba started research on this solution by working on the subject of nanoparticles under the guidance of her university supervisors. She believes the results of her work are yet to be “fanciful”. She obtained them by working in her neighborhood, collecting and sorting larvae with the help of her relatives.

“The effectiveness of this solution has been proven after several tests. I had a whole flat in my house for this work. Our product quickly killed the larvae we used. I also continued my experiments in my university laboratory. The results were always conclusive,” she reported.

Recently she was listed among the 20 young women scientists in Africa by UNESCO and the L’Oreal Foundation. She had applied for this award and the meticulous work of the experts who award it proves the effectiveness of this larvicide, according to her.

As a doctoral student in science, Ntoumba started research on this solution by working on the subject of nanoparticles under the guidance of her university supervisors. She believes the results of her work are yet to be “fanciful”. She obtained them by working in her neighborhood, collecting and sorting larvae with the help of her relatives.

“The effectiveness of this solution has been proven after several tests. I had a whole flat in my house for this work. Our product quickly killed the larvae we used. I also continued my experiments in my university laboratory. The results were always conclusive,” she reported.

Recently she was listed among the 20 young women scientists in Africa by UNESCO and the L’Oreal Foundation. She had applied for this award and the meticulous work of the experts who award it proves the effectiveness of this larvicide, according to her.

 

Stay updated via social media

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.